Equipping Professionals to be Effective Communicators
Equipping Professionals to be Effective Communicators
Equipping Professionals to be Effective Communicators
Equipping Professionals to be Effective Communicators

Communication Tip #8

“You’re” or “your”:
This confusion is just as widespread as “too” vs. “to”. (See my previous grammar tip.)
Simply put: “You’re” means you are. “Your” does not. “Your” is possessive. Period.
Examples:

  • Your cat. Your career.
  • Your use of the words you’re writing communicates it own message.
  • You’re the composer of your thoughts and words.

(By the way, when in doubt, write out “you are.” It’s more professional, too.)

  • You are right, _____!

Something isn’t very true, extremely impossible, really inevitable. I push my clients to let the foundational words do their work. Qualifiers dilute.

(And here’s my nemesis: pretty cool! What does that mean! What does cool mean? Does pretty weaken cool it or strengthen cool? Here’s an example where the listener has to do all the defining!